Photos from Waylon Missi Pumphrey's post

So I had a little bit of charging issues on my vt1100 I thought it was a stator or regularator going come to find out the connection of the 2 was the issue must have been going on for some time bike has 42k glad I didn't waste money buying 2 parts I didn't need there are some great people with great advice on this page that have helped me a lot thanks again Carl Chiaramonte big big help

12 comments
  • My pleasure. Paying it forward. I found mine the same way you did. A member on the hondashadow.net forum helped me.work out some problems when I first got my ACE. We all have to stick together!

  • Nice ride!

  • Carl Chiaramonte thanks not bad for a 98 I have done a lot of custom and add on stuff my favorite is the rinehart exhaust mod I got a deal on the slip ons

  • Did you see mine?

  • Carl Chiaramonte red one

  • Hell yeah Carl I was ready to buy a new stator and reg

  • Right on, dude! Glad you found it.

    Sounded like a loose connection to me because it was sometimes working and sometimes not...

  • I get told not many issues on the stator or reg with 42k

  • That's good to know, And The info Carl Chiaramonte gave is very good to know as well

  • I know when I pulled seat I saw that plug I was like dam dude is dead serious about this stuff Iam still a lil stun

  • there is a reason that plug got that hot, been though this myself last year no fun. I found one of my stator wire was rubbing on the frame and grounding out, the owner before me moved the cover boot up and never put it back in place. :/

  • Yeah Tommy Lee poor design vibration and gravity pulling down on a crap connector causes arcing and heat build up. If the wire was rubbing on ground on the stator side of the connector the connector wouldn't burn. The rub had to be after the connector. The connectors burn like that because with a loose connection the voltage arcs across the gap causing heat...heat causes metal and plastic to expand making the gap the arc has to jump bigger causing more heat more gap and so on until the gap is too large to jump across.